How to Format a Number as a Currency in Javascript

There are quite a few ways to format a number as a currency value in Javascript.

Doing it yourself

The easiest of which is that of using the built-in toFixed() method.

Often times you will either have a string, integer or floating-point number (/double) and will need to output a value that looks like a currency.

So this: 12345.67120398 should become this: 12,345.67.

Let’s take the following example:

var yourBalance = 2489.8237;

//returns 2489.824 (rounds up)
yourBalance.toFixed(3);

//returns 2489.82
yourBalance.toFixed(2);

//returns 2489.8237000 (pads the decimals)
yourBalance.toFixed(7);

But what about formatting the “thousands”, or “millions” sections?

A winning short and fast solution would be to use the following:

// input: `12345.67`
(12345.67).toFixed(2).replace(/\d(?=(\d{3})+\.)/g, '$&,');

// output: `12,345.67`

If we run the above short and fast solution against a range of values, we can see how it plays out in the following output:

1        --> "1.00"
12       --> "12.00"
123      --> "123.00"
1234     --> "1,234.00"
12345    --> "12,345.00"
123456   --> "123,456.00"
1234567  --> "1,234,567.00"
12345.67 --> "12,345.67"

This is pretty good, so let’s go one step further and create a more sophisticated prototype function we can use on all Number types:

Number.prototype.format = function(len, w_part, s_delim, c_delim) {
var re = '\\d(?=(\\d{' + (w_part || 3) + '})+' + (len > 0 ? '\\D' : '$') + ')',
        num = this.toFixed(Math.max(0, ~~len));

    return (c_delim ? num.replace('.', c_delim) : num).replace(new RegExp(re, 'g'), '$&' + (s_delim || ','));
};

Now we get to use our new Number prototype extension method:

12345678.9.format(2, 3, '.', ',');
// "12.345.678,90"

12345678.9.format(0, 3, '-');
// "12-345-679"

123456.789.format(4, 4, ' ', ':');
// "12 3456:7890"

Using ECMAScript Internationalization API

There is a newer ECMAScript functionality provided by the Internationalization API.

const formatter = new Intl.NumberFormat('en-US', {
  style: 'currency',
  currency: 'USD',
  minimumFractionDigits: 2
})

// "$1,000.00"
formatter.format(1000);

// "$10.00"
formatter.format(10);

// "$1,234,567,890.00"
formatter.format(1234567890);

The same can be done for other currencies too.

You can explore it a bit here for the Intl.NumberFormat from Mozilla.

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